Subsidiary Public Transport Plans for Klang Valley

Despite the Klang Valley Transport Grid Plan 2025 being pretty exhaustive in detailing out specific measures to align routes (network) and nodes (urban centres), it is the responsibility of municipalities to come up with strategic and detailed plans on improving first-last mile pedestrian and bicyclist access to nearby bus stops and urban centres.

The proposed Klang Valley Spatial and Transport Coordination Authority (SPARTAN) could be given mandate to provide fundamental toolboxes and guidelines for municipal planners to contribute towards Subsidiary Plans to the Klang Valley Transport Grid Plan 2025.

The Subsidiary Plans are listed as per below:

Timed Transfer and Private Shuttle Transfer Plan (Non-Exhaustive)

Timed transfer or pulse is a scheme where two different timetable-required bus services are scheduled to simultaneously depart from a shared bus stop location so that passengers do not have to wait for a connecting bus.

There are many private access and institutional areas within Klang Valley that are clustered around a single entry/exit point, and it does not make any economical sense for bus routes to be duplicated to serve these areas. As these areas typically have their own transport fund, it is practical for these institutions to provide shuttle bus services, with gateway bus stops that interface with the present frequent bus network.

Frequent Bus Stop Access Plan (Non-Exhaustive)

The Klang Valley Transport Grid Plan 2025 prioritises at-grade crossings for access to the bus network, wherever possible. This is true, as overpasses require expensive retrofitting for wheelchair-friendly uses, frequent maintenance on lifts and lighting, and, in many places, intrusive safety and security surveillance cameras.

However, in traffic thoroughfares where at-grade crossing is impossible, pedestrian overpasses need to be built with access to bus stops on both sides of the thoroughfares. Thus, the overpasses need to be built not only with access to bidirectional bus stops underneath the overpass, but also with Pedestrian Mall ambiance and functionality designed into it. No visually-obstructive overpass advertisement banner must be allowed, and the elevated gangway must be equipped with power outlets and wide enough to allow for pedestrian-friendly retail uses (such as kiosks and night market stalls).

Municipalities should also be empowered to enforce adjacent large-scale building complex developers to integrate the elevated Pedestrian Mall design into their own project plans. Such requirement is already being espoused in the National Physical Plan 3.

In areas where overpasses are difficult to be financially justified, municipalities have no other choice but to introduce new Uni-directional Frequent Bus Stops. The location of the stops must be strategically picked, so that there will be same-route backtracking transfer opportunity to reversing direction nearby the chosen stops (i.e. User from bus stop A taking bus 1 heading north, transferring to bus 1 heading south on the next stop just north of bus stop A, or user from bus 1 heading south, transferring to bus 1 heading north on the prior stop just south of bus stop A).

Cross-Directional Bus Interchange Plan – Bandar Menjalara (Example)

Municipalities is expected to take charge on planning for safe, quick, comfortable and barrier-free pedestrian plan that allows hassle-free interchange of different bus services. An example below shall illustrate the positioning of bus stops together with at-grade pedestrian crossings, sidewalks and pedestrian shortcuts (cul-de-sac connector).

Municipal bylaws must be coded to ensure parceling of lands do not have any negative impact on pedestrian network permeability surrounding bus stops, and designing of buildings with orientation and access towards the pedestrian paths leading to the bus stops.

Bidirectional Bus Stop Plan – Parlimen Malaysia (Example)

Municipalities is expected to take charge on planning for hassle-free bus stop and pedestrian access plan that secures efficiency, linearity and bidirectionality of bus routes and safe, quick, comfortable and barrier-free pedestrian access to the planned bus stops. An example below shall illustrate the positioning of bus stops together with at-grade pedestrian crossings and pedestrian shortcuts (cul-de-sac connector).